Home

About PHC

Award of Brewing

Mailing List

Hoppy Halloween

Yeast Bank

PHC Merchandise

Links

 

PHC members have access to the clubs yeast bank. Anyone wanting yeast can contact the club's Yeastmaster, Susan Ruud, by e-mail (susan.ruud at ndsu.edu)  

The yeast will be provided in the form of a yeast slant.  With a slant, all you do is rinse the tube out with either sterile water or wort and pour it into whatever size starter you want to use 24 - 48 hours before you want to use it.  Making up several bottles of wort ahead of time by boiling for 30-45 minutes works well and the extra bottles can be stored in the freezer for future usage.  

If you have questions about the yeast or the process of getting a slant, please contact Susan.

  

The PHC Yeast Collection - December 2006

Ale yeasts
American Ale #1056
American Ale II #1272
British Ale #1098
German Ale #1007
High Gravity Ale #WLP099
Irish Ale #1084
London Ale #1028
Norwich Ale #1187
Scottish Ale #1728
Special London Ale #1968
Swedish Porter #1742
Thames Valley Ale #1275

 

Lager yeasts
American Lager #2035
Bavarian Lager #2206
Bohemian Lager #2124
California Lager #2112
Czech Pils #2278
Danish Lager #2042
Munich Lager #2308
Oktoberfest/Marzen #WLP820
Southern German Lager #WLP838

Belgian and Wheat yeasts
Belgian Ale #1214
Belgian Ale/Koelsch WLP029

Belgian Ardennes #3522
Belgian Saison #WLP565
Belgian Strong Ale #1388
Belgian White #3944
Dusseldorf Alt #WLP036
German Alt #1338
Kolsch #2565

Summit Hefe
Trappist Ale #YLA08

 

Wine and Mead yeasts
Cabernet Red #WLP?
Chardonnay White Wine #WLP730
Cote Des Blancs
Dry Mead
English Cider #WLP775
Flor Sherry 

Lalvin 71B-1122
Montrachet
Premier Cuvee
Sweet Mead

  

Yeast Descriptions

Ale Yeasts

American Ale #1056

(Wyeast #1056) - Behaves somewhat like a lager yeast by remaining active down to around 50F degrees and fermenting some minor sugars that ale yeasts normally do not utilize. Ferments dry and finishes soft, smooth and clean with a neutral flavor profile. The relative neutrality of this strain makes it well suited for a wide range of styles including light ales, American wheats, American Pale Ales, Alt Biers, classic English Pale Ales, IPAs, Scottish Ales, Porters and Stouts. This strain tolerates alcohol reasonably well and therefore also can be used in Strong Ales (Scotch or English), Imperial Stouts and Barleywines. A very well balanced, very slow fermenting strain. Low to medium flocculation. Apparent attenuation: 73 - 77%. (60-72F) (a.k.a. The Chico strain used by Sierra Nevada Brewing) This yeast may be the same as Seibel BRY-96. It has also been reported to be the old ale strain used by Ballantine. Regardless of the source, American Ale is an excellent all purpose yeast. If you are undecided as to what beer to brew or what yeast strain to use, American Ale will never let you down. In short, it IS a dandy!

PHC NOTES: An excellent ale strain that has become a ěworkhorseî for a number of your fellow Companions. Capable of producing clean beers (very low esters) at temperatures as high as 75 degrees. Can mutate, producing beers with heavy phenolic (turpentine-like) aromas and flavors!

Back to the Yeast List

 

British Ale #1098

A Good Ale and a Good Lager by Ray Taylor

The yeasts of the month happen to be old standbys. They were among the first pure liquid strains to be released to homebrewers and are part of the original dozen strains that formed the basis of the PHC yeast bank. Both strains have performed well for us and many award winning beers have been brewed with them.

British #1098 - There is a bit of confusion concerning this strain. The Zymurgy yeast issue says that this is a well rounded strain producing a complex flavor profile and is especially suited for sweeter, maltier beers (ie. northern style Bitters, Scottish Ales and Brown Ales). In contrast, Wyeast says that 1098 ferments dry and crisp with a slight tartness. It is well balanced and capable of fermenting at very cool ale temperatures. Medium flocculation. Apparent attenuation: 73 - 75%. (64-72F) (a. k. a. "The Whitbred strain").

PHC NOTES: Very quick starting and rapidly fermenting. One of the club's most popular yeast strain (and deserving of the notoriety). A workhorse and a winner! British Ale can become very "fruity" when used at higher temperatures. Our experience with the strain seems to indicate that it's characteristics are more in line with the Wyeast description.

Back to the Yeast List

 

German Ale #1007

It's April - I Must Be in Germany by Ray Taylor

German Ales are unique because well, they are German Ales. In a land devoted to and known for its lagers, these beers are rare and yet very tasty. German brewers basically produce only two beer styles with top fermenting yeasts - Alt and Kolsch. These beers are brewed in a small region in the northeastern part of the country. In fact, Germany's ale breweries are primarily localized in two cities. Altbier calls Dusseldorf its home, while Kolsch can be enjoyed a little farther south in Cologne. For anyone wishing to duplicate these styles, choice of yeast is everything. Fortunately, the PHC club yeast collection has just what you might be looking for if you want to brew up one of these German classics.

German #1007 - A fine all purpose yeast. Ferments dry and crisp with a complex yet mild flavor (relatively neutral flavor profile). Truly a "top fermenting" strain producing an extremely rocky head during fermentation! Will ferment to 55 degrees. High flocculation. Apparent attenuation: 73 - 77%. (55-66F) The source of this yeast is unknown. OUR NOTES: Although excellent for German style ales, several PHC members favor this strain for Brown Ales and English Milds. It also makes very nice Pale Ales. This has been one of the club's most popular yeast strains over the years.

Back to the Yeast List

 

London Ale #1028

This is another of the dozen or so strains that started the PHC culture collection. It was a popular strain early on but has fallen into a period of disuse as we have collected newer ale strains. It is still a solid English-type ale yeast that definitely deserves another look and some renewed brewing attention.

London Ale #1028 - Adds a rich, distinctive complexity that contributes a "woody" or "minerally" flavor to the beer. Some diacetyl production. Excellent in bitters, IPAs, brown ales, porters and stouts. Medium flocculation. Apparent attenuation: 73 - 77%. (60-72F - optimum 68F). This is reported to be the strain from Bass Worthington Whiteshield. OUR NOTES: The unique flavor profile produced by this strain may be too much for some people. The "London Strain" is both loved and hated. Try it yourself and form your own opinion! Quite attenuative. Finishes dry, bringing out the hops.

Back to the Yeast List

 

Special London #1968

Wyeast 1968: A Good All Purpose British Ale Strain by Ray Taylor

Special London Yeast #1968 - Wyeast describes this is a Fuller's strain but it is also reputed to be the strain used by Youngs of London. This strain has been sold as English London E.S.B. and London Ale II. It produces beers with rich malty character and balanced fruitiness. Low attenuation but high flocculation. Excellent for producing cask conditioned ales. Apparent attenuation 67-71%. (64-72F). This strain is used by two local Fargo-Moorhead breweries.

PHC NOTES: This strain flocculates quickly and brilliantly. Beer finishes with a soft maltiness. Some club members love this strain while others have had mixed results. It should work well for all types of British Ales.

Back to the Yeast List

 

German Alt #1338

It's April - I Must Be in Germany by Ray Taylor

German Ales are unique because well, they are German Ales. In a land devoted to and known for its lagers, these beers are rare and yet very tasty. German brewers basically produce only two beer styles with top fermenting yeasts - Alt and Kolsch. These beers are brewed in a small region in the northeastern part of the country. In fact, Germany's ale breweries are primarily localized in two cities. Altbier calls Dusseldorf its home, while Kolsch can be enjoyed a little farther south in Cologne. For anyone wishing to duplicate these styles, choice of yeast is everything. Fortunately, the PHC club yeast collection has just what you might be looking for if you want to brew up one of these German classics.

German Alt #1338 - From Wissenschaftliche in Munich, this strain adds a rich, complex flavor. Finishes very malty producing a sweet, dextrinous, full bodied beer. Dense rocky head produced during fermentation. Fermentation temperature is considerably lower than for most ale yeasts (60-72F) - Optimum temperature = 68F. High flocculation. Apparent attenuation: 67 - 71%. (a.k.a. European Ale). This is strain #338 from Wissenschaftliche Station. OUR NOTES: The strain to use if you want to produce an authentic German Ale (Alt or Kolsch). Ferments beer to a mild, sweet finish with a fruity aftertaste. A long period of cold lagering will bring out the best in this strain. This is a MUST!

Back to the Yeast List

 

Kolsch #2565

It's April - I Must Be in Germany by Ray Taylor

German Ales are unique because well, they are German Ales. In a land devoted to and known for its lagers, these beers are rare and yet very tasty. German brewers basically produce only two beer styles with top fermenting yeasts - Alt and Kolsch. These beers are brewed in a small region in the northeastern part of the country. In fact, Germany's ale breweries are primarily localized in two cities. Altbier calls Dusseldorf its home, while Kolsch can be enjoyed a little farther south in Cologne. For anyone wishing to duplicate these styles, choice of yeast is everything. Fortunately, the PHC club yeast collection has just what you might be looking for if you want to brew up one of these German classics.

Kolsch #2565 - A hybrid yeast with ale and lager characteristics. Ferments well at moderate temperatures (52-56F). Ferments at higher temperatures (64F) but can produce sulfur at these temperatures. Beers produced with this strain should have good maltiness, subdued fruitiness and a crisp finish. Very low flocculation. Apparent attenuation 73-77%. (56-64F) This strain was originally used by a brewery in Koln (Cologne), Germany. OUR NOTES: The strain to use if you want to produce an authentic Kolsch. It also can be used to produce German Altbiers

Back to the Yeast List

 

Lager Yeasts

Bavarian Lager #2206

A Good Ale and a Good Lager by Ray Taylor

The yeasts of the month happen to be old standbys. They were among the first pure liquid strains to be released to homebrewers and are part of the original dozen strains that formed the basis of the PHC yeast bank. Both strains have performed well for us and many award winning beers have been brewed with them.

Bavarian #2206 - This strain is used by many German breweries. It produces rich, complex flavors while finishing clean and full bodied. Similar to Munich (#2308) but brings out more of the malt and less of the hop character and is less difficult to work with. Because of this, these strains may be used interchangeably. An excellent choice for Bocks or Oktoberfests. Medium flocculation. Apparent attenuation73-77%. (Optimum temperature range: 48-58F). Source: Wissenschaftliche Station 206.

PHC NOTES: Produces a clean, robust German-style lager. Ferments to a full-flavored, crisp finish without the soft bready flavor of some of the more delicate lager yeasts

Back to the Yeast List

 

Bohemian Lager #2124

(Wyeast #2124) - The traditional Saaz yeast from the Czech Republic.Ferments clean and finishes with a rich residual maltiness. Finishes dryer than the Czech Pils #2278. Excellent in high gravity pilsners. The choice for a classic Continental Pilsner (Bohemian or German). This strain is also capable of producing some very good Bocks/Doppelbocks. Medium flocculation. Apparent attenuation 69-73%. (46-54F). This is the Weihenstephan 34/70 strain. It is also reported to be the EKU strain.

PHC NOTES: Very low ester and diacetyl production compared to other lager strains in the collection when used at temperatures of 50 degrees or less. A very good lager strain. A definite winner!

Back to the Yeast List

 

California Lager #2112

So you say you would like to try your hand at brewing lager beers but don’t have the refrigeration capacity to do so. Well take a look at this month’s featured strain. You may be surprised to find that a good Oktoberfest, Bock, Pilsner or generic lager might not be that far out of reach.

California Lager #2112 - This is a warm fermenting bottom cropping strain. Ferments well to 65 degrees while keeping lager characteristics. Finishes with a malty profile. High flocculation, clears brilliantly. It should produce some outstanding "steam-style" or California Common Beers. Apparent attenuation: 69-73%. Ideal fermentation temperature range: 58-68F. (a. k. a. "The Anchor strain"). This is reported to be the lager strain used by the Anchor Brewing Co.

PHC NOTES: Although by definition any of our lager strains could be used to make a "steam beer", this is the strain to use if you really want to capture the essence of the style. Produces a "cleaner" beer at ale temperatures (60 to 75 degrees) than any other lager yeast. Very slow fermentation even at 62 - 68 degrees. Strain 2112 will produce decent lagers at cool basement temperatures.

Back to the Yeast List

 

Munich Lager #2308

This is the strain from Wissenschaftliche in Munich. It was one of the first pure strains to be made available to American homebrewers. Munich 2308 is a complex strain that finishes smooth, soft, well rounded, full-bodied and very malty. Can be unstable and is very finicky. Must be taken through a strict temperature regime or it will likely produce high levels of diacetyl (VERY UNDESIRABLE in lagers). See The Fermenter - Vol.1 No.2 or the special zymurgy yeast issue for details on the temperature requirements of this strain. This strain makes a fine Munchner Helles. Also recommended for dunkels, bocks and heavier German beers. Apparent attenuation: 73-77% Medium flocculation. (48-56F - optimum temperature=50F) (a. k. a. German Lager and Munich No. 308).

PHC NOTES: Accentuates the malty character of a full bodied lager. Ideal for traditional German lagers. Not as spicy as the Bavarian lager. Although this strain is purported to be difficult to work with, it has produced some "award winning" PHC beers. This strain is prone to diacetyl production and warm "diacetyl rests" for 12 - 20 hours at 60 - 65 degrees are recommended.

Back to the Yeast List

 

Wheat and Wine Yeasts

Belgian Ale #1214

(Wyeast #1214 - An abbey-style top fermenting yeast from Wyeast suitable for high gravity beers (Dubbels, Tripels, Barleywines). A medium flocculating strain that clears well. Apparent attenuation 72-76%. (58-68F).

PHC NOTES: Can ferment high gravity beers (up to 1.080) and will leave a fruity character in the finished product Caution! This strain will produce extremely high levels of esters/phenolics if fermented above 68 degrees. VERY VIOLENT FERMENTATIONS!!! This strain is reported to be the one used by Chimay.

Back to the Yeast List

 

Trappist Ale YL A208

(YL #A08) - Another abbey-style top fermenting yeast from Yeast Labs. This strain also performs well under high gravity/high alcohol situations. It is suitable for (Belgian Pale Ales, Dubbels, Tripels, Strong Ales, Barleywines). High flocculation, clears well.

PHC NOTES: Ferments high gravity (up to 1.0100) wort very well and will leave a light fruity character in the finished product. This strain ferments a little cleaner than the #1214 leaving a pleasant but apparent phenolic character in the finished beer. Several PHC award winning Belgian Ales have been produced with this strain. A definite winner! The source of this strain is currently unknown..

Back to the Yeast List

 

 

[Home][About PHC][Mailing List][Hoppy Halloween][Yeast Bank][Merchandise][Links]

 

webmaster@prairiehomebrewers.org

Copyright © 2003-2012 Prairie Homebrewing Companions. All rights reserved.